Utah State Route 202

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State Route 202

SR-202 in red
Route information
Defined by Utah Code §72-4-126
Maintained by UDOT
Length1.683 mi[1] (2.709 km)
Existed1969–present
Major junctions
South end SR-201 near Magna, Utah
North end I-80 near Great Salt Lake
Location
CountryUnited States
StateUtah
Highway system
  • Utah State Highway System
SR-201 SR-203

State Route 202 (SR-202) is a 1.683-mile (2.709 km) long state highway in the U.S. state of Utah that serves as a connector, linking SR-201 to Interstate 80 (I-80) in rural Salt Lake County. The road has existed since at least 1937, when it connected U.S. Route 40 (US-40) and US-50 via the Garfield Cut-Off Road. The road also serves as a connection from SR-201 to eastbound, I-80 as this connection is not available at the interchange between those two highways.

Route description

Located entirely in Salt Lake County, Utah, SR-202 begins at an intersection with SR-201 and 11500 West northwest of Magna, Utah. The road travels northwesterly, bordered on the east by a large tailing pond owned by Kennecott Utah Copper and part of the former Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad rail line,[2] which is now owned by the Union Pacific Railroad (UP). The parallel rail line intersects a pair of east–west rail lines, the southern line being UP main line, and the northern line being the Feather River Route of the former Western Pacific Railroad, which is now owned by UP.[3] After crossing the rail lines, SR-202 intersects with I-80 near the Great Salt Lake State Park and comes to a terminus at the I-80 frontage road, which provides access to the Great Salt Lake State Park and to the Saltair resort.[4] Kennecott Utah Copper owns all of the land surrounding SR-202, except for the right-of-way for the railroad, and the highway itself.[5]

SR-202 serves as the eastbound ramp from SR-201 onto Interstate I-80, because at its intersection with I-80, the SR-201 (which is the southern terminus of SR-202) traffic only has the option to continue on I-80 westbound, and does not have an offramp to eastbound I-80.[6] Traffic on SR-202 has increased 12% between 2002 and 2007, with a daily average of 735 cars per day using SR-202 in 2007,[7] compared to 475 cars per day in 2002.[8] Half of the traffic on SR-202 consists of buses and trucks.[9]

History

Two other roads have been designated Utah State Route 202 in the past. From 1939 to 1953, the name was used by the road that formed the eastern approach to Mercur, Utah and later became part of SR-73.[10] From 1961 to 1967, the name was used by Main Street between SR-201 (2100 South) and SR-171 in downtown Salt Lake City, which is now part of Utah State Route 186.[11]

The road that currently carries the SR-202 designation has existed since 1937, when it connected US-40 and US-50 along the Garfield Cut-Off Road.[12] The Utah State Legislature designated the road SR-202 in 1969, thus taking responsibility of maintaining the road from the county.[13]

On September 26, 2008, a sulfuric acid spill occurred, reported by people in vehicles traveling on Interstate 80.[14]

In 2015, as part of a federal-aid project, a traffic signal was installed at the junction with SR-201, which was moved slightly to the west; as a result, the south end of SR-202 was realigned, resulting in a net loss of approximately 0.21 miles (0.34 km) of state highway mileage.[13]

Major intersections

The entire route is in Salt Lake County.

mi[1]kmDestinationsNotes
0.0000.000 SR-201 – Magna, KennecottSouthern terminus
1.303–
1.596
2.097–
2.569
I-80 – Elko, Salt Lake City
1.6832.709Saltair Drive / Frontage RoadNorthern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b "Highway Reference Online - SR-202". Utah Department of Transportation. May 2008. Retrieved December 24, 2018.
  2. ^ General highway map — Salt Lake County, Utah (Map). Utah Department of Transportation. 2005. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  3. ^ Utah Multipurpose Map (Map). 1:250,000. 5 of 7. Cartography by AAA Engineering and Drafting. Utah Travel Council. pp. 103–105. § F-1.
  4. ^ Google (October 7, 2008). "SR-202 Overview" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 7, 2008.
  5. ^ Assessor Parcel Viewer / Public Version (Map). Cartography by ArdMS. Salt Lake County, Utah Assessors Office. 2008. Retrieved September 27, 2008.
  6. ^ Google (September 15, 2008). "SR-201/I-80 interchange" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  7. ^ "Traffic Statistics". Utah Department of Transportation. 2007. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  8. ^ "Traffic Statistics". Utah Department of Transportation. 2004. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  9. ^ "Traffic Statistics". Utah Department of Transportation. 2007. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  10. ^ Utah State Legislature (1939). "Chapter 47: Designation of State Roads". Session Laws of Utah. Route 202. From a point on route 73 near Fairfield westerly to Mercur.
  11. ^ "State Road Resolutions SR-176.pdf". Utah Department of Transportation. Retrieved October 7, 2008.
  12. ^ Texaco Road Map Idaho, Montana, Wyoming (Map). 1:1,774,080. Cartography by Rand McNally. Texaco. 1937. § N-6. Retrieved September 15, 2008.
  13. ^ a b "State Road Resolutions SR-202.pdf". Utah Department of Transportation.
  14. ^ Hollenhorst, John; Giauque, Marc (September 26, 2008). "Acid spill shuts down I-80 on-ramp". KSL-TV. Archived from the original on June 4, 2011. Retrieved October 7, 2008.