Ontario Highway 801

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Highway 801

Auden Road
Road 801
A map of Highway 801, highlighted in red
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length14.0 km[1] (8.7 mi)
ExistedOctober 24, 1963–September 1, 2010
Major junctions
South end Highway 11 / TCH west of Jellicoe
North endNamewaminikan River bridge
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsThunder Bay
Highway system
Highway 800 Highway 802

Tertiary Highway 801, now known as Road 801 or Auden Road, was a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. The 14.0 kilometres (8.7 mi) tertiary highway was located entirely in Greenstone, in south central Thunder Bay District. It was established in 1963 as a forest resource access road to the Sturgeon River Mine. In 2010, jurisdiction over the highway was transferred to the Ministry of Natural Resources.

Route description

Highway 801 began at Highway 11, part of the Trans-Canada Highway, at Nezah, between the towns of Jellicoe to the east and Beardmore to the west. The entirely gravel-surfaced road travelled 14.0 kilometres (8.7 mi) north through dense boreal forest to the Namewaminikan River.[2] From there, the locally maintained Auden Road continued north to the Auden flag stop serviced by VIA Rails Canadian line.[3][4] Highway 801 was located within the former townships of Walter and Elmhirst.[5] There are no communities along the former highway, with Jellicoe being the closest settlement, 10 kilometres (6 mi) to the east.[4] In 2008, the final year for which traffic data is available, an average of 90 vehicles travelled along the highway each day.[6]

History

Highway 801 was first assumed as a provincial highway on October 24, 1963, as a forest resource access road to connect Highway 11 with the Sturgeon River Mine.[7][8] The route remained unchanged throughout its existence. On September 1, 2010, jurisdiction over the highway was transferred to the Ministry of Natural Resources. Today the roadway is signed as Road 801.[9]

Major intersections

The following table lists the major junctions along Highway 801, as noted by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.[1] The entire route is located in Thunder Bay District.[3] 

Locationkm[1]miDestinationsNotes
Greenstone0.00.0 Highway 11 – Beardmore, JellicoeTrans-Canada Highway
Unorganized Thunder Bay District14.022.5Namewaminikan RiverHighway ends at river crossing[1]
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

References

  1. ^ a b c Provincial Highways Distance Table. Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. 1989. pp. 51–52. ISSN 0825-5350.
  2. ^ Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2008). "Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts" (PDF). Government of Ontario. Archived from the original on February 8, 2012. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  3. ^ a b Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by Geomatics Office. Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. 2001. § G8. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  4. ^ a b Google (October 19, 2020). "Highway 801 - Length and Route" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  5. ^ Mackasey, W.O. (1976). Geology of Walters and Leduc Townships (Report). Ministry of Natural Resources. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  6. ^ Traffic Office, Highway Standards Branch (December 31, 2008). Traffic Volumes 1988–2008 – King's Highways / Secondary Highways / Tertiary Roads (Report). Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. p. 894.
  7. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways Ontario. 1962. Northern Portion inset. § F17. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  8. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Department of Highways Ontario. 1963. Northern Portion inset. § F17. Retrieved October 19, 2020.
  9. ^ "MNRF Road Segments - OGF ID#121979552". Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry. 2020. Retrieved October 19, 2020.

External links