List of secondary highways in Rainy River District

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This is a list of secondary highways in Rainy River District, most of which serve isolated and sparsely populated areas in the Rainy River District of northwestern Ontario.

Highway 502

Highway 600

Highway 600

Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length86.4 km[1] (53.7 mi)
Major junctions
West endRainy River north limits, north of Highway 11
Major intersections Highway 617
 Highway 619
 Highway 621
East end TCH-blank.svg Highway 71 / TCH near Black Hawk
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsRainy River District
TownsRainy River
Highway system
Highway 599 Highway 601

Provincial Highway 600 is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its total length is 86.4 kilometres (53.7 mi). Its western terminus is Highway 11 in Rainy River, and its eastern terminus is at Highway 71. It is also one of only a few Ontario highways that are still gravel.

Highway 602

Highway 602

Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length44.6 km[1] (27.7 mi)
Major junctions
West end  TCH-blank.svg Highway 11 / Highway 71 / TCH in Emo
Major intersections Highway 613
 Highway 611
East endFort Frances west limits at Oakwood Road
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsRainy River District
TownsEmo, Fort Frances
Highway system
Highway 601 Highway 603

Highway 602 is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its total length is 44.6 kilometres (27.7 mi). Its western terminus is Highway 11 in Emo, and its eastern terminus is at Highway 71 in Fort Frances.

Highway 611

Highway 613

Highway 613

Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length39.9 km[1] (24.8 mi)
Major junctions
South end Highway 602 at Big Fork
Major intersections Highway 11
North endDead end at Lake Despair government dock near Naicatchewenin First Nation
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsRainy River District
TownsBig Fork, Devlin, Burriss, and Government Landing
Highway system
Highway 612 Highway 614

Secondary Highway 613 is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its total length is 39.9 kilometres (24.8 mi). Its northern terminus is near Hope Lake and the Northwest Bay First Nation Reserve, and its southern terminus is at Highway 602.

Highway 615

Highway 615

Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length21.3 km[1] (13.2 mi)
ExistedMay 9, 1956[2]–present
Major junctions
South end TCH-blank.svg Highway 71 / TCH near Off Lake Corner
North endDead end at Clearwater Lake
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsThunder Bay District
TownsOff Lake Corner, Burditt Lake
Highway system
Highway 614 Highway 617
Former provincial highways
Highway 616  →

Secondary Highway 615, commonly referred to as Highway 615, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in Rainy River District. The route connects Highway 71 (the Trans-Canada Highway) with Burditt Lake and Clearwater Lake. It is 21.3 kilometres (13.2 mi) in length.[1] Highway 615 was assumed in early 1956.[3][4]

Highway 617

Highway 619

Highway 621

Highway 622

Highway 623

Highway 633

Highway 633

Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length5.1 km[1] (3.2 mi)
ExistedOctober 29, 1959[5]–present
Major junctions
South end TCH-blank.svg Highway 11 / TCH approximately 30 km (20 mi) east of Atikokan
North endDead end at Kawene flag stop
Location
CountryCanada
ProvinceOntario
DistrictsRainy River District
TownsKawene
Highway system
Highway 632 Highway 634

Secondary Highway 633, commonly referred to as Highway 633, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario, located in Rainy River District. The route begins at Highway 11, the Trans-Canada Highway, approximately 30 kilometres (20 mi) east of Atikokan. It travels north for 5.1 kilometres (3.2 mi) to the village of Kawene, ending at a flag stop on the Canadian National Railway.

Highway 633 was assumed by the Department of Highways, predecessor to the modern Ministry of Transportation, on October 29, 1959.[5] It has remained unchanged since then.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2016). "Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts". Retrieved February 1, 2021.
  2. ^ Ontario Department of Highways (March 31, 1956). "Appendix No. 3 - Schedule of Assumptions of Sections of the King's Highway System for the Fiscal Year". Annual Report (Report). pp. 203, 216.
  3. ^ Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins. Ontario Department of Highways. 1956.
  4. ^ "Ontario Secondary Roads Now Designated 500, 600". Vol. 112, no. 33, 119. The Globe and Mail. February 4, 1956. p. 4. Two new Ontario road numbers appear on the province's 1956 official road map which will be ready for distribution next week. The new numbers are the 500 and 600 series and designate hundreds of miles of secondary roads which are wholly maintained by the Highways Department. More than 100 secondary roads will have their own numbers and signs this year. All of these secondary roads were taken into the province's main highways system because they form important connecting links with the King's Highways
  5. ^ a b Ontario Department of Highways (March 31, 1960). "Appendix No. 3A – Schedule of Designations and Re-designations of Sections of the King's Highway and Secondary Highway Systems for the Fiscal Year Ending March 31, 1959". Annual Report (Report). pp. 237–239. Retrieved February 8, 2021.