Interstate H-201

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Interstate H-201

Moanalua Freeway
Map
H-201 highlighted in red
Route information
Auxiliary route of H-1
Maintained by HDOT
Length4.1 mi[1] (6.6 km)
Existed1989–present
HistorySigned in 2004
NHSEntire route
Major junctions
West end Route 99 in Aiea
Major intersections H-1 in Aiea
H-3 in Halawa
East end H-1 in Honolulu
Location
CountryUnited States
StateHawaii
CountiesHonolulu
Highway system
Route 200 Route 220
Route 76Route 78 Route 80

Interstate H-201 (named the Moanalua Freeway) is the only auxiliary Interstate Highway located outside the contiguous United States, serving the island of Oʻahu in the US state of Hawaii. The 4.1-mile-long (6.6 km) loop route connects exits 13 and 19 on H-1, passing Fort Shafter, Tripler Army Medical Center, and the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility.

Despite being designated an Interstate in 1989, until mid-2004, the route was an unsigned Interstate, signed only as Route 78. The section of the Moanalua Freeway between Route 99 (Kamehameha Highway) and the western H-1 interchange remains designated as Route 78.

Route description

H-201 serves as an alternate route to H-1 near Downtown Honolulu, traveling on the Moanalua Freeway around the northeast side of Salt Lake. It begins at a junction with Route 99 on the north side of Aloha Stadium, located near Joint Base Pearl Harbor–Hickam. The freeway travels east through an interchange with H-1, which continues west toward Kapolei and south to Daniel K. Inouye International Airport, and H-3. H-201 and H-3 briefly run parallel to each other through Halawa, where the former intersects Kahuapaani Street, before H-3 splits to continue northeast across the Koʻolau Range. H-201 turns southeast to avoid Red Hill and travels through Moanalua, a residential neighborhood with hospitals operated by Kaiser Permanente, the US Department of Veterans Affairs, and the US Army (including Tripler Army Medical Center). The freeway continues southeast, passing Moanalua Gardens and an industrial area, before it bisects Fort Shafter, a military installation in the Kalihi valley. H-201 then terminates on the south side of Fort Shafter at an interchange with H-1, which continues southeast towards Downtown Honolulu on the Lunalilo Freeway.[2][3]

The freeway is maintained by the Hawaii Department of Transportation (HDOT) and is designated as part of the National Highway System, a network of strategic highways in the US.[4] H-201 is generally six to eight lanes wide with an eastbound high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane during the morning rush hour from Halawa to Puuloa Road.[5] Traffic volumes on the highway, measured in terms of annual average daily traffic, ranged in 2020 from a minimum of 19,800 vehicles at its western terminus to a maximum of 136,100 vehicles near H-3.[6]

History

H-201 eastbound approaching exit 3 in Moanalua. Letters in H-201 shields require thinner text, such as on signage like this one.

Moanalua Road, the direct predecessor to H-201, was an unpaved road constructed in the late 19th century to connect Honolulu's King Street to Aiea.[7] The road was macadamized in 1899 but remained in poor condition for several years, prompting calls to prioritize its improvement for tourists.[8][9] It was repaired in the 1910s, following the establishment of Fort Shafter, and plans were announced to straighten sections of the road in 1921.[10][11]

The territorial government began preliminary construction of a four-lane divided highway to replace Moanalua Road in 1948, following the opening of the new Tripler Army Hospital.[12][13] The project, which would reduce the number of curves on the road from 24 to 6, was also meant to connect with the Mauka Arterial (now part of H-1) and relieve congestion on the Kamehameha Highway near Pearl Harbor.[14][15] The westernmost 2.7 miles (4.3 km) of the divided highway was dedicated and opened to traffic on April 28, 1954.[16] The road was designated as part of Route 72 in 1955.[17]

The remaining section of the original Moanalua Road, bisecting Fort Shafter, was upgraded to a divided highway in the second phase and end at an interchange with the Lunalilo Freeway (also part of H-1).[18][19] With funding from the territorial highway department and approval of the US Army, several facilities at Fort Shafter were relocated to new buildings in 1958 and the former Tripler Army Hospital was demolished in May 1959 to make way for the project.[20][21] Construction began in June 1959 under a $1.46-million (equivalent to $11.3 million in 2022[22]) contract awarded to Hawaiian Dredging and Construction.[23][24] The widened Fort Shafter section of the Moanalua Highway was opened in September 1960, featuring an interchange at E Street and several overpasses.[25]

Plans to upgrade the western terminus at Aiea to an interchange with the Kamehameha Highway were approved in the late 1950s.[26] Construction began in 1960, and the Aiea interchange opened in stages between June 1965 and November 1965, at a cost of $2 million (equivalent to $14.2 million in 2022[22]).[27] A western extension of the Moanalua Highway from the Aiea interchange with flyover ramps to connect to the Kamehameha Highway was approved for construction in 1964 and was opened to traffic in June 1966.[28][29] The interchange with the Lunalilo Freeway at the eastern end of the highway was completed in May 1964.[30]

The conversion of the highway to a full freeway began in September 1971 with work near Red Hill and was completed in August 1974.[31][32] It was estimated to cost $37 million (equivalent to $172 million in 2022[22]) total to construct.[33] An eastbound lane between Halawa and Puuloa Road was designated for carpools of four or more people in October 1974.[34] The highway was designated as Route 78 in the early 1970s.[35][36]

Hawaii Route 78

LocationHonolulu
Length0.739 mi (1,189 m)
Existed1989–present

The Federal Highway Administration approved the addition of H-201 to the Interstate Highway System on November 1, 1989.[37] HDOT requested that the Moanalua Freeway be reclassified as an Interstate so that the interchange with H-1 at the eastern end could conform to federal highway standards. HDOT originally asked the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) in June 1990 to approve the freeway as H-1A in an application to AASHTO's Special Committee on US Route Numbering, the committee which approves Interstate Highway designations.[38] HDOT resubmitted a request later that year to number it as H-101, and AASHTO approved it as H-201 on December 8, 1990.[39] The highway was initially designated H-1A, but AASHTO policy does not generally allow alphabetic suffixes in Interstate numbers.[40] The final designation, H-201, conforms to the general rule for three-digit Interstate loop routes that uses an even initial digit.[39]

Until 2004, HDOT chose not to sign H-201 as such, instead retaining the designation Route 78. Reasons given included the following:

  • inability to render the new route number in a legible manner (because it has four characters, longer than the one to three characters of any other Interstate, it is necessary to use the thinnest font to render the number, and the shield is wider than the standard Interstate shield)
  • encouraging motorists to use the newer and better designed H-1
  • avoiding confusion with H-2[37][41]

In July 2004, in conjunction with a major resurfacing of both sides of the freeway, it was decided to bring the signage in line with the official designation.[37]

Exit list

The entire route is in Honolulu County.

Locationmi[2]kmExitDestinationsNotes
Aiea0.00.0
Route 99 west – Pearlridge, Pearl City
Continues as Route 99
Stadium, AieaWestbound exit and eastbound entrance; access via Moanalua Road
0.50.801A
H-1 east – Honolulu International Airport, Pearl Harbor
No westbound exit
1C


H-1 west to H-2 north – Pearl City
Westbound signage; no eastbound exit
Halawa0.91.41BStadium, Halawa, Camp SmithNo westbound entrance; signed as exit 1E westbound; access via Kahuapaani Street
1.42.31C
H-3 east – Kaneohe
Eastbound signage; no westbound entrance; signed as exit 1D westbound; exit 1B on H-3
Honolulu2.43.92Moanalua Valley, Salt Lake, Red HillAccess via Ala Kapuna and Ala Napunani Streets
3.76.03 Puuloa Road (Route 7310) – Tripler Hospital, Moanalua Gardens, Airport
4.57.24Fort Shafter, Ahua StreetNo number designation on eastbound exit
King StreetEastbound exit and westbound entrance
4.67.4
H-1 east – Honolulu
Exit 19B on Interstate H-1
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi
  •       Route transition

References

  1. ^ Starks, Edward (January 27, 2022). "Table 2: Auxiliary Routes of the Dwight D. Eisenhower National System of Interstate and Defense Highways". FHWA Route Log and Finder List. Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved January 22, 2023.
  2. ^ a b Google (November 14, 2021). "Interstate H-201" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  3. ^ "Oahu State Roads and Highways". Hawaii Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  4. ^ Federal Highway Administration (October 1, 2020). National Highway System: Urban Honolulu, HI (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Washington, DC: Federal Highway Administration. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  5. ^ "Special Use Lanes". Hawaii Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  6. ^ "HIDOT Highways Program Status". Hawaii Department of Transportation. Retrieved November 14, 2021.
  7. ^ "A Country Ride". Honolulu Evening Bulletin. March 30, 1883. p. 2. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  8. ^ "Road Supervisor Alive". Honolulu Evening Bulletin. May 2, 1899. p. 5. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "Want Roads to Please Tourists". Honolulu Evening Bulletin. October 4, 1905. p. 1. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ "Campaign to Put Roads in Shape, Engineer's Plan". The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. September 23, 1919. sec. 2, p. 1. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  11. ^ "Moanalua Road at Golf Course Entrance to Be Widened, Ohrt". The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. October 13, 1921. sec. 2, p. 1. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  12. ^ "New Divided Highway". The Honolulu Advertiser. November 28, 1948. p. 12. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "Road Extension is Approved by Army". The Honolulu Advertiser. August 23, 1949. p. 4. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ Biggs, Betsey (March 3, 1953). "New Moanalua Road Will Ease Traffic Load on Kam Highway". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. p. 15. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  15. ^ "New Road To Be Dedicated". The Honolulu Advertiser. April 23, 1954. p. B10. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  16. ^ "New Section Of Moanalua Rd. Is Dedicated". The Honolulu Advertiser. April 29, 1954. p. A9. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ Chevron; H.M. Gousha Company (1959). Hawaii With Street Map of Honolulu (Map). Chicago: H.M. Gousha Company. Honolulu inset. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via David Rumsey Map Collection. {{cite map}}: External link in |inset= (help)
  18. ^ "Four Traffic Interchanges In Congested Areas Studied". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. December 25, 1956. p. 3. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "3-Level Grade Structure To Speed Kalihi Traffic". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. March 4, 1958. p. 12. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  20. ^ "T.H. Builds Army Houses Under Highway Agreement". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. September 27, 1958. p. 7. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  21. ^ "Historic 'Old Tripler' Is Demolished". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. May 19, 1959. p. 9. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  22. ^ a b c Johnston, Louis; Williamson, Samuel H. (2023). "What Was the U.S. GDP Then?". MeasuringWorth. Retrieved December 19, 2023. United States Gross Domestic Product deflator figures follow the Measuring Worth series.
  23. ^ "Moanalua Road To Be Widened At Fort Shafter". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. February 27, 1959. p. 2. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ "Marshy Ground Drained for Moanalua Road". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. June 26, 1959. p. 4. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  25. ^ "New Highway Signs More Easily Read". The Honolulu Advertiser. September 12, 1960. p. A13. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  26. ^ "Big Highway Program Is Scheduled for 1958". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. November 15, 1957. p. 22. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  27. ^ "Moanalua Switchover To Open". The Honolulu Advertiser. November 10, 1965. p. A12. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  28. ^ "Highway Segment Authorized at Aiea". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. February 5, 1964. p. 28. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ "Aiea interchange opening". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. June 14, 1966. p. B7. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  30. ^ "New Traffic Pattern in Kalihi Area". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. May 2, 1964. p. 6. Retrieved November 24, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Two Moanalua Freeway Lanes Open Tuesday". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. August 7, 1974. p. A7. Retrieved November 22, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Bone, Robert W. (August 18, 1973). "Moanalua Freeway finally coming to the end of its road". The Honolulu Advertiser. p. B4. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  33. ^ Bone, Robert W. (January 16, 1972). "$37 million Moanalua Freeway to uncork bottleneck". The Honolulu Advertiser. p. D2. Retrieved November 17, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "Freeway carpool lane 'all right'". The Honolulu Advertiser. October 2, 1974. p. A6. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Location Map — Project No. U-078-1(3): Moanalua Road, FAP 78 Puuloa Interchange to Middle Street". The Honolulu Advertiser. June 20, 1973. p. D9. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ Rand McNally (1989). "Hawaii" (Map). Rand McNally Road Atlas: United States/Canada/Mexico. Scale not given. Chicago: Rand McNally. p. 5. Oahu inset. OCLC 19224098. Retrieved September 9, 2007 – via Broer Map Library.
  37. ^ a b c Watanabe, June (July 27, 2004). "Kokua Line: Moanalua is actually part of interstate". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. Retrieved August 7, 2016.
  38. ^ Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (June 4, 1990). "Report of the Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering to the Executive Committee" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 16, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2015.
  39. ^ a b Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering (December 8, 1990). "Report of the Special Committee on U.S. Route Numbering to the Executive Committee" (PDF) (Report). Washington, DC: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 16, 2017. Retrieved June 8, 2015.
  40. ^ American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (January 2000) [Retained from August 10, 1973]. "HO2: Establishment of a Marking System of the Routes Comprising the National System of Interstate and Defense Highways" (PDF). AASHTO Transportation Policy Book. American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Archived from the original (PDF) on January 1, 2014. Retrieved June 8, 2015.
  41. ^ Watanabe, June (August 30, 2004). "New freeway designation demystified". Honolulu Star-Bulletin. p. 2. Retrieved November 14, 2021 – via Newspapers.com.

External links